Las Golondrinas Fiber Arts Festival

The booth we shared.

The booth we shared.

A few weekends back (Memorial Day weekend), Cabin Textiles and Woven Hearth teemed up to participate in the Santa Fe Fiber Arts Festival held at the beautiful El Rancho de Las Golondrinas. It was a wonderful weekend, even with the rain (or in my little opinion, especially because of the rain).  There were plenty of vendors, demonstrations, and archery! Yes, archery. Which was particularly thrilling for those standing next to me when I took my try at the range. Plus, all visitors and vendors had access to various exhibitions and museum and walking trails available at Las Golondrinas.

Cotton shag Happy Rug by Cabin Textiles.

Cotton shag Happy Rug by Cabin Textiles.

This was my first time at this venue, and I got lost. Yes, I did check a map before heading off. No, I did not trust my map – instead I followed the signage. Haha! So, the scenic route for me. Turns out there are two ways to approach Las Golondrinas. The one I discovered took me through La Cienega and past their trash transfer station. The second route is much more direct, utilizing the frontage road.

Rugs by Woven Hearth.

Rugs by Woven Hearth.

Anyway, it is an exceptionally beautiful location and I look forward to visiting Las Golondrinas again. And they had wifi so I could use my little credit card swiper gizmo. Hooray! We had a corner booth that worked out quite well for displaying one of my mom’s (Sandy Voss’s) large rugs on the wall. Our booth neighbors (TDLT Fiber Artists) were a cheery group of ladies who shared food and drinks back and forth with us throughout the weekend. (Barbara Anne – thank you for the humus!).

There were also lots of demonstrations – both the regular ones provided by Las Golondrinas volunteers and some of the vendors. Sheep, bunnies, spinning, felt work, paper making, weaving, etc. And I met Inger Seitz, whose work I have seen through the Las Tejedoras Newsletter. Chatting with her about rag rug weaving in Finland was great!

What follows are lots and lots of pictures. enjoy!

Contact Info for artists who I had the joy of photographing:

Sacred Heart Cafe, Patty Mara, Box 5D, Pilar Route HC69, Embudo, NM 87531, pmgourley@gmail.com, www.pattymara.etsy.com

The Natural Twist, Ruth Baldwin, 877-TNT-WOOL, 505-453-2277, ruth@TheNaturalTwist.com, TheNaturalTwist.com

Felt Free, Jo Thompson, jo@feltfree.com, feltfree.com, feltfree-itswhatifelt.blogspot.com

TDLT Fiber Artists, PO Box 114, Penasco, NM 87553, 575-758-1730, TDLT@GauchoBlue.com, www.gauchoblue.com/TDLT.html

Rio Fernando Farm, Shelley Loveless, #3 Sunset Drive, Taos, NM 87571, 575-758-0019, riofernandofarm@gmail.com

Hairball Yarns, A. Smith-Nelson, Lot15/15 North Mesa Stables, Los Alamos, NM 87544

Lisa Joyce Designs, Lisa Joyce de Burlo, PO Box 1716, Taos, NM 87571, lisajoydb@gmail.com, www.lisajoycedesigns.com

Cabin Textiles, Sandy Voss, PO Box 10, Abiquiu, NM 87510, sandyvoss@cybermesa.com, www.cabintextiles.com

Nicole Blais – feltmaker and Las Golondrinas volunteer, & unfortunately I can’t find contact info for her.

Beautiful roving by The Natural Twist.

Beautiful roving by The Natural Twist.

 

 

 

 

Dolls by the TDLT Fiber Artists.

Dolls by the TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Woven wraps by TDLT Fiber Artists.

Woven wraps by TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

The de-fuzzing of an angora rabbit by Rio Fernando Farm.

The de-fuzzing of an angora rabbit by Rio Fernando Farm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

More skeins by Hairball Yarns.

More skeins by Hairball Yarns.

 

 

 

 

 

More felt art by Las Golondrinas volunteer Nicole Blais.

More felt art by Las Golondrinas volunteer Nicole Blais.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a medieval spindle with cast bronze whorl & oak shaft from The Natural Twist.

Here is a medieval spindle with cast bronze whorl & oak shaft from The Natural Twist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rag rugs by the TDLT Fiber Artists.

Rag rugs by the TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

 

Table loom demo by TDLT Fiber Artists.

Table loom demo by TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Felt pins by Lisa Joyce Designs.

Felt pins by Lisa Joyce Designs.

 

 

 

 

Happy hat by Felt Free.

Happy hat by Felt Free.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rag rug made from faux fur by Woven Hearth.

Rag rug made from faux fur by Woven Hearth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural dyes by The Natural Twist.

Natural dyes by The Natural Twist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Locally spun, hand-dyed wool by TDLT Fiber Artists.

Locally spun, hand-dyed wool by TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

 

Wall felt art by Sacred Heart.

Wall felt art by Sacred Heart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spun tidbits by Lisa Joyce Designs.

Spun tidbits by Lisa Joyce Designs.

 

 

 

 

Felt hat by Felt Free - I see a dragon or Sky Eel!

Felt hat by Felt Free – I see a dragon or Sky Eel!

 

 

 

 

 

Rag rugs by Woven Hearth (left - bedsheet material, right- blue jeans).

Rag rugs by Woven Hearth (left – bedsheet material, right- blue jeans).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Felt art by TDLT Fiber Artists.

Felt art by TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hanging chakra by Sacred Heart.

Hanging chakra by Sacred Heart.

 

 

 

 

 

Hand-spun skeins by Lisa Joyce Designs.

Hand-spun skeins by Lisa Joyce Designs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table sheep from Felt Free.

Table sheep from Felt Free.

 

 

 

 

Purses & potholders by TDLT Fiber Artists.

Purses & potholders by TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Faerie play sets by Sacred Heart.

Faerie play sets by Sacred Heart.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skeins, hats, and purses by Lisa Joyce Designs.

Skeins, hats, and purses by Lisa Joyce Designs.

 

 

 

 

 

A felt purse by Felt Free.

A felt purse by Felt Free.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table runners by TDLT Fiber Artists.

Table runners by TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Felted soaps in various scents by Rio Fernando Farm.

Felted soaps in various scents by Rio Fernando Farm.

 

 

 

 

 

Spinning demo by Lisa Joyce.

Spinning demo by Lisa Joyce.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Little sheep at Las Golondrinas 2014.

Little sheep at Las Golondrinas 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

Placemats by TDLT Fiber Artists.

Placemats by TDLT Fiber Artists.

 

 

 

Skeins by Rio Fernando Farm.

Skeins by Rio Fernando Farm.

 

 

 

 

Skeins by Hairball Yarns.

Skeins by Hairball Yarns.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Felt work by Las Golondrinas volunteer Nicole Blais.

Felt work by Las Golondrinas volunteer Nicole Blais.

 

 

 

 

 

Paper making frame is pulled through a tub of water that contains pulp.

Paper making frame is pulled through a tub of water that contains pulp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pulp is collected on the screen with one pull through the tub of water.

Pulp is collected on the screen with one pull through the tub of water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The top half of the frame is removed & paper laid face down on another board to dry.

The top half of the frame is removed & paper laid face down on another board to dry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here was have paper made at the paper demo.

Here was have paper made at the paper demo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Taos Wool Festival 2013

The ATTL Booth with people!

The ATTL Booth with people!

I know I am behind with my posts. Doing a complete career change is a little time consuming, but things are settling down and I find I have some time for sharing my silly pictures with folks.

So many baskets of skeins!

So many baskets of skeins!

Back in October 2013, I participated in the Taos Wool Festival with the Art Through The Loom guild. I have enjoyed the festival for years, but this was my first time participating as an artist. It was nice sharing a booth with a group of ladies, as that meant we could share booth time. The ATTL participators were Glenna Dean, Kathy Konecki (Necessary Little Luxuries), Nancy Woodworth, Suzanne Correira (Fire Ant Ranch), Sandy Voss (Cabin Textiles), Diane de Souza, and myself. This was great for everyone as it can be a kind of long weekend with set up Friday afternoon, and then all day Saturday and Sunday, with take down at 4 or 5 PM Sunday. I also had a cold, so I was all snivelly. And our booth was in the shade, so it was quite chilly for the entire weekend for us.

Woven and knitted clothing.

Woven and knitted clothing.

Yet, despite the sniffles and the cold, I still had a blast. Friday set up was probably the hardest part. We had to figure out how to put up two tents. Haha! I like to sit back and simply take direction, but we had a limited number of people who were familiar with the tents, and lots of people trying to help. Still, there was plenty of laughter throughout the process.

Skeins by various ATTL members.

Skeins by various ATTL members.

I was told that many people will come walk through on Saturday and buy larger items on Sunday. As I was selling rugs, I didn’t expect any sales Saturday, but one happened Saturday morning, and then again, and again. Sunday was good too. And Sunday I brought my man to help with take down. We showed up early to have time to walk around. Also, there is this amazing food booth that sells kibbeh in Greek yogurt and tortilla. So good! Us ladies at the booth also got him to model a button neck scarf thingy. Yeah, that’s a technical term.

Wool shag rugs by Cabin Textiles & Woven Hearth.

Wool shag rugs by Cabin Textiles & Woven Hearth.

And then there is the livestock. Yes, fuzzy-wuzzies are allowed at this event. People bring their bunnies, their sheep, their llamas, their alpacas. And sometimes they even put on demonstrations, showing how to shear the wee beasties. My man especially likes the llamas because they hum. And he hums back at them and they nearly always respond, some of them walking up to him. Though I don’t know if they see him as a kindred spirit or are contemplating spitting in his eye. Never can tell with a llama.

Here's a handsome llama.

Here’s a handsome llama.

This year, I purchased just one thing of goat milk soap. As I was changing careers from a stable office job to a weaver, I felt the need to conserve money. It was hard. Very hard. So many gorgeous things, left, right, and center. And people definitely encourage you to touch items, enjoy them. They know how to tempt! My mom purchased a new wooden shuttle from the folks she has been buying from for years, KCL Woods. It’s a gorgeous little piece.

This is my Farm Ninja outfit. Nifty face scarf thingy, huh?

This is my Farm Ninja outfit. Nifty face scarf thingy, huh?

And then we participated in the swap bin. Each year, the Taos Wool Festival organizers go around with a wagon full of items donated by the participants. You can swap for something of equal or lesser value. The wagon hit us late Sunday after I was all packed up and simply helping other ATTL members. My mom insisted I play so she donated a little rug and I got this nifty knitted thingy (a cowl?) made by Kathy Hartmeister. Well, you can see in my Farm Ninja photo that it fits over my head and is wide enough to cover my ears, nose, mouth, and neck. I really, really like it because, unlike a scarf, there are no ends to get tangled in the hay or inadvertently dunked in the water trough as I see to farm chores.

Here are some knitting kits for those who forgot their own knitting.

Here are some knitting kits for those who forgot their own knitting.

As I live near Ojo Caliente, I took the back road to Taos each day, which took me over the Taos Gorge. On Sunday, my man and I stopped to walk the bridge and take photos like tourists. Sunday I also wore my one and only knitted-by-me sweater. I got lots of compliments on it at the festival, which was nice. It is not something I would have worn to the office as I think many people would find it odd. I think I am going to really enjoy hanging out with artists.

This is my man modeling a neck collar for us ladies.

This is my man modeling a neck collar for us ladies.

This is me at the Taos Gorge in my knitted sweater.

This is me at the Taos Gorge in my knitted sweater.

My mom's new shuttle.

My mom’s new shuttle.

Little sheep!

Little sheep!

Taos Gorge, October 2013.

Taos Gorge, October 2013.

More skeins.

More skeins.

Alpacas!

Alpacas!

More skeins and roving at the ATTL booth.

More skeins and roving at the ATTL booth.

Some wool throws and a wool rug.

Some wool throws and a wool rug.

Skeins by various ATTL members.

Skeins by various ATTL members.

Shaggy llama.

Shaggy llama.

The ATTL Booth!

The ATTL Booth!

Affordable Art

This is made from bedsheet fabric. I playfully call it 'Moonlit Water'. And that's Phil the cat.

This is made from bedsheet fabric. I playfully call it ‘Moonlit Water’. And that’s Phil the cat.

This will be my first year in participating in the Fuller Lodge Affordable Arts Show that runs from November 22 – January 4. Fuller Lodge is located in downtown Los Alamos, NM and is free admission to the public. I am very happy to say that I will be joining many other talented artists. Many of these artists have been featured on the Fuller Lodge facebook page, if you want to check them out.

Made from upholstery fabric, this rug turned out pretty handsome.

Made from upholstery fabric, this rug turned out pretty handsome.

So, what rugs of mine will be there? Well, a little bit of everything. I have 2 sock rugs, several wool shags, 3 cotton shags, 2 flat cottons, one upholstery rug, and a wool sweater rug.

All my rugs are recycled from waste fabrics. For the most part, these are the selvedge edges of blankets or bedsheets that would normally end up in a landfill. Instead, I turn them into rugs. All the socks and sweaters used in my rugs had holes, tears, or stains (or were lonely socks that had lost their mates). Now they are hardy, usable rugs. All the rugs are washable in a cold water cycle with air drying (no heat).

Here are a variety of wool shags for the 2013 Fuller Lodge Affordable Arts Show.

Here are a variety of wool shags for the 2013 Fuller Lodge Affordable Arts Show.

This is a cotton shag, which is cotton and rayon.

This is a cotton shag, which is cotton and rayon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are both cotton shags, which I nicknamed the Adobe Sisters.

These are both cotton shags, which I nicknamed the Adobe Sisters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

These 2 rugs are made from socks. Yep, lots and lots of socks.

These 2 rugs are made from socks. Yep, lots and lots of socks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a blue & brown wool sweater rug (with sock rugs behind it).

Here is a blue & brown wool sweater rug (with sock rugs behind it).