Recycle Santa Fe Show: Our Booth

Another picture of wool shag rugs by Cabin Textiles & Woven Hearth.

Another picture of wool shag rugs by Cabin Textiles & Woven Hearth.

For the 2013 Recycle Santa Fe Show, my mom (Cabin Textiles) and I (Woven Hearth) shared a booth. The booth fee for a single participant is $350 and then a single artist may be added to the booth for an additional $50. As you can see, it’s great to be able to find someone to split the booth fee with. Even though I have only done a handful of shows so far, this was easily the highest booth fee, for a 3-day weekend. However, we both did great at the show, so no complaints from us!

This is a rug made from sweaters (by Woven Hearth).

This is a rug made from sweaters (by Woven Hearth).

This post will be mostly photos to show what we brought. Since this is a show that focuses on making art from trash (recycling), the show regulations has a minimum amount of recycled materials the art must contain to be allowed in the show (I believe it is 75%). All our rugs shown here easily met that rule. In fact, I find myself hard pressed to think of any recent rugs either of us has made that didn’t meet this rule…

This is a striking wool shag rug from Cabin Textiles.

This is a striking wool shag rug from Cabin Textiles.

Each show I learn something new. At this one, it was the term, ‘upcycle‘ which is used to describe making high art from recycled materials. Since all the participants in this show were doing recycled art, I could see the full range of items, and the different take on recycling trash materials into art.

This is a rug made from socks (by woven Hearth).

This is a rug made from socks (by woven Hearth).

This was also my first time to use my Paypal card swiper gizmo, and it was a success. In fact, all my sales were done with the card swiper. My mom was using her old-school metal & carbon copy swiper for her sales. So we had a direct comparison. I think my mom now wishes to switch to the gizmo, as means less work for her – you don’t have to call in the card charges individually. Hooray for the electronic age!

Another wool shag rug by Cabin Textiles.

Another wool shag rug by Cabin Textiles.

My friends J & J and Bailey dog also gave us a hand in both setting up and taking down. It was very much appreciated! Lugging bags of rugs around is heavy work, and then the metal frame we used for the booth wasn’t a total joy in setting up or taking down. So it was great to have the extra muscle.

A cotton shag (Woven Hearth) rug.

A cotton shag (Woven Hearth) rug.

My mom brought a few of her larger rugs, include one off the big loom – 7 feet by 9 feet – and they drew a lot of inquiries. It is rare for one of these larger ones to sell at a show, but letting people know such sizes are available, and handing them our cards, leads to special orders.

 

A variety of our wool shag rugs.

A variety of our wool shag rugs.

 

 

 

This large rug (by Cabin Textiles) measures 9 ft. x 7 ft.

This large rug (by Cabin Textiles) measures 9 ft. x 7 ft.

 

Recycle Santa Fe Art Festival 2013: The Trash Fashion Show

This dress is made from burlap bags.

This dress is made from burlap bags.

This year was my first to take part in the Recycle Santa Fe Art Festival, which was held Nov. 15-17. On Friday evening, there is the Trash Fashion show which features clothing made from things that would otherwise end up in a landfill. It was truly impressive what all the contestants came up with. Most of this post is going to be pictures, though I wish I had gotten a few more.

You’ll see that I was impressed with the seatbelt dress – red and black, such a great combo! The burlap bag dress was also very chic. There was this Flapper style dress that was made up of dangly glass bits, some of which fell off on the runway. It was also very stunning.

Another young lady made a Greek goddess dress from paper, though I only managed to get a decent picture of the dress after the show when many of the outfits are displayed.

Made from grocery bags.

Made from grocery bags.

One outfit was made from airline travel tickets. She brought her dog up on the runway too, who had a skirt made from barf bags. It was very cute. Then another young lady had this ballroom style dress made from chicken feed bags. It was very elegant. The skirt was also removable, and when it was removed, it revealed a chicken wire frame for the skirt, with a live chicken in it! Alas, the young lady was too quick for my older camera. Though I would be quick too if I had a life chicken up my skirts!

OK, so the rest of this post will be pics. Sit back and enjoy!

Made from filters.

Made from filters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Made from seatbelts.

Made from seatbelts.

 

 

 

 

 

Made from photography film and cardboard packaging.

Made from photography film and cardboard packaging.

 

 

 

 

 

Made from some sort of foil?

Made from some sort of foil?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The skirt is from plastic table clothes and the top from plastic milk cartons.

The skirt is from plastic table clothes and the top from plastic milk cartons.

 

 

 

1920s style dress.

1920s style dress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This dress was made from dryer sheets.

This dress was made from dryer sheets.

 

 

A few more dresses from the fashion show.

A few more dresses from the fashion show.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three dresses from the fashion show.

Three dresses from the fashion show.

 

 

A hat made from cardboard of photography supplies.

A hat made from cardboard of photography supplies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This skirt is made from sneakers.

This skirt is made from sneakers.

 

 

Here is that burlap sack dress.

Here is that burlap sack dress.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One dress made from seatbealts and the other made from ????

One dress made from seatbealts and the other made from ????